Author Archives: Zend DevZone Editor

ZendCon Sessions Episode 036: “Pragmatic Guide to Git”

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Git is hard; at least if you listen to the naysayers. Actually, you need to know a handful of commands to navigate Git successfully. This talk demystifies Git. Once we're finished you'll know everything you need to start using Git in your day-to-day projects and collaboratively with other developers.

ZendCon session by Travis Swicegood

Episode 35: Unit Testing in Zend Framework 1.8

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Zend Framework 1.8 has improved and simplified how you can test your applications, providing you with excellent techniques to streamline your quality assurance processes and reduce your maintenance costs. Hear Michelangelo van Dam talk about how to best harness the unit testing features of Zend Framework.

ZendCon 2010 Podcast – Introducing Zend Framework 2.0

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Speakers: Ralph Schindler and Matthew Weier O'Phinney

Zend Framework has grown tremendously since the first public preview release in March 2006. Originally a slim, MVC framework with a number of standalone components, it has grown to a codebase more than 2M lines of code. Work now turns to version 2, with goals of increased simplicity and advanced PHP 5.3 usage.

ZendCon 2010 Podcast – Do You Queue?

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There has been a lot of talk over the past several years about the difference between performance and scalability. When talking about building a scalable application queuing is a concept that many PHP developers are not overly familiar with. In this talk we will demonstrate how you can use the Zend Server Job Queue to scale your application.

ZendCon 2010 Podcast – A New Approach To Object Persistence In PHP

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The object-relational impedance mismatch makes persisting PHP objects in a relational database a daunting task. How about these new schemaless NoSQL databases? We will have a look at the problems involved with persisting PHP objects, and introduce design patterns that help solving these problems. Putting the patterns to good use, we will build a working PHP object persistence solution for MongoDB.

ZendCon 2010 Podcast – Dependency Injection

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This session introduced one of the less-known design patterns in the PHP world, but also one that can greatly improve the decoupling and the testability of your code: Dependency Injection. I will demonstrate how to use Dependency Injection in your projects, and I will take advantage of the PHP 5.3 new features to create a fully-featured DI container live.

Dallas Techfest PHP Track

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On July 30th in DFW, take part in the Dallas TechFest! It is a one day technical conference and we’re happy to say that we have a good PHP track. Let’s blow out the attendance. It’s on a Friday so you won’t be getting anything done anyway.

The full speaker list is at http://www.dallastechfest.com/Agenda/tabid/88/Default.aspx. There are several PHP-based sessions that you might find interesting.

Columnar databases and how they can help with the data avalanche

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There are gargantuan amounts of data that organizations are storing thanks to the advent of really cheap storage. To cope with this, organizations end up buying bigger and bigger database servers/clusters. But maybe, just maybe, there’s a shortcut. This coming Thursday (July 22nd) Zend is having a webinar with InfoBright looking at how a columnar databases can help deal with analytical data requests on large amounts of data.

Pragmatic Bookshelf: SQL Antipatterns: Avoiding the Pitfalls of Database Programming

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Bill Karwin has helped thousands of people write better SQL and build stronger relational databases. Now he’s sharing his collection of antipatterns—the most common errors he’s identified in those thousands of requests for help.

Most developers aren’t SQL experts, and most of the SQL that gets used is inefficient, hard to maintain, and sometimes just plain wrong. This book shows you all the common mistakes, and then leads you through the best fixes. What’s more, it shows you what’s behind these fixes, so you’ll learn a lot about relational databases along the way.